Potholes are actual holes in a road surface and are more than just an eyesore. They are often the source of accidents and property damage. If you were injured because a pothole caused your motorcycle accident in Texas, you could be compensated by those responsible for roadway safety. A motorcycle injury lawyer can help you explore your options in pursuing compensation for medical bills, repairs, and other expenses.

A Motorcycle Injury Lawyer in Texas Can Help Determine if You Have a Case

Potholes cause motorcycle accidents in several ways. Perhaps your bike had a blowout, roll over, or you simply lost control because of the deep crevice. Potholes are increasingly becoming more common and more expensive. According to Forbes magazine, pothole damage costs drivers in the United States $3 billion each year.

See Your Healthcare Professional ASAP

Your first priority is taking care of your health. If you have not seen a doctor, do so as soon as possible. Be sure to follow your healthcare professional’s recommendations. Then, call a motorcycle injury lawyer. A lawyer from D. Miller & Associates, PLLC will evaluate your case for free. It is possible that you could pursue compensation from those responsible for pothole and road safety.

Finding Who Is Responsible for Potholes and Road Safety in Texas

Like all property owners, city and state governments have a legal obligation to keep public roadways safe and free from obstacles. This means:

  • Repairing known hazards
  • Posting a warning to motorists about hazards that need repair
  • Searching for unknown or potential hazards

If a municipality does not fix known potholes or takes an unreasonably long time to repair them, you may be able to hold them accountable for your injuries and damages.

Texas Government Is Not Immune from Personal Injury Lawsuits

The Texas Tort Claims Act

gives citizens the legal right to file a personal injury lawsuit if a state, local, or city government is negligent. The government may face liability if negligence, omission, or a wrongful act of a government employee or unit causes personal injury, property damage, or death.

Proving Your Case

You could have a case if a pothole caused your motorcycle accident with injuries in Texas. A motorcycle injury lawyer will review the circumstances of your accident by reviewing evidence such as:

  • Photos of the accident site, pothole, and motorcycle damage
  • Measurement of the pothole’s depth and diameter
  • Accident or police reports
  • Witness statements
  • Medical bills that might include a doctor’s opinion about your injuries
  • Review of the government body’s maintenance crews, road inspection, and any public complaints about the pothole

What Your Claim May Include

A motorcycle injury lawyer will ask for all of your medical bills and expenses to include in your claim against the government. The items included in the claim might include:

  • Present and follow-up medical bills
  • Property damage
  • Lost pay
  • Temporary or permanent decrease in earning capability
  • Pain and suffering
  • Mental anguish
  1. Miller & Associates, PLLC Files Texas Tort Claims

Seeking compensation from the government is different than in a typical motorcycle accident involving another motorist. Depending on where your accident took place, you could file a claim against the state or a city. There are different time limits and specific requirements among government bodies. A lawyer from D. Miller & Associates, PLLC will guide you through the complex process of suing the government. You do not pay attorney fees unless and until we recover compensation.

Our Legal Team Will Defend and Protect Your Rights

If a pothole caused your motorcycle accident with injuries in Texas, a lawyer from D. Miller & Associates, PLLC will recommend the best course of action should if we file a lawsuit on your behalf, the government will try to discredit or deny your claim. This might include:

  • Questioning your actions before the accident; asking if you were distracted or drowsy.
  • Ways you should have tried to avoid the pothole.

Inquiring about the condition of your motorcycle prior to the accident.